Clinical & Research
Patients' Eye Color a Clue to Pain Tolerance
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, May 06, 2014 05:38 PM

Preliminary research data indicates that caucasian women with light-colored eyes -- blue or green -- appear to tolerate pain better than Caucasian women with brown or hazel eyes.  Differences in hair color have been linked to resistance to anesthesia, and eye color has been associated with behavior and possibly neural transmission. "However, there has been limited research examining the relationship between eye color and the human pain experience.

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Young Blood Reverses Aging?
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, May 06, 2014 05:24 PM

As a follow up to the story reported last week Blood of World's Oldest Woman Hints at Limits of Life a study now reports injecting old mice with blood from younger mice improved their cognitive abilities along with promoting new neuron growth in their spinal cords, researchers found -- further evidence that some factor in blood keeps regenerative processes going for a time, but then disappears with aging.

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Treat Car Crash Pain Early
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, May 06, 2014 05:17 PM

"Over four million adults present to U.S. emergency departments each year after motor vehicle collisions. The great majority of these individuals are discharged to home after emergency department evaluation, but a subset of these individuals develop motor vehicle collision-related widespread pain which is characterized by substantial suffering and functional loss. We believe that this research indicates that doctors have to start treating these individuals with persistent widespread pain very early, and not wait for the pain to resolve in itself."

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Dieting Shrinks Liver
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, May 06, 2014 04:54 PM

A two-week-long restrictive diet appears to shrink obese patients' livers enough to make gall bladder laparoscopic surgery quicker and easier, researchers reported.  "When obese individuals diet, their livers actually shrink and that permits surgeons to more easily perform the laparoscopic surgery."  The researchers noted when livers have less fat, they are not as rigid and can be moved more easily in the surgery, with less physical damage occurring.

Researchers observed that using a very-low-calorie diet before bariatric surgery appeared to reduce liver volume and improve bariatric access.  They also note that bariatric surgery that produces weight loss in obese and morbidly obese patients also appears to cause favorable changes in the histology of the liver.

"What we found surprised us," researchers said. "Not only did we find that bariatric surgery reduced fat deposits in the liver, but we also saw that the procedure reduced liver inflammation. We also found that the procedure reversed early-stage liver fibrosis and scarring."  The type of bariatric surgery may not make a difference in benefit.

"In many ways, as long as weight loss is induced, then you are going to be able to see improvement in liver histology.  What appears critical is to reduce the inflammation in the liver, which can be achieved through weight loss and the removal of the fat deposits in the liver. In our animal studies we have observed that the liver turns from an organ that stores fat to an organ that burns fat after bariatric surgery," he said. "We are on to something important in the way that weight loss affects liver histology."

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BMI Predicts Neck Pain After Car Crash
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, May 06, 2014 04:49 PM

"Ninety percent of patients seen in the emergency department after motor vehicle collisions are not admitted," researchers said. 'Unfortunately, chronic post-motor vehicle collision pain develops in 20% to 40% of these individuals."

The researchers noted that population-based and postoperative studies suggest a relationship between lingering pain and increased body mass index. "  The researchers found that increasing body mass index was also associated with the number of body regions in which pain persisted, as well as for overall persistent pain.

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Secondary Stroke Prevention Guidance Updated
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, May 06, 2014 04:41 PM

The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association have updated the guidelines for secondary prevention in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA).  The document includes new sections on nutrition and sleep apnea and revisions of several other sections, including those dealing with hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, carotid stenosis, and atrial fibrillation.

Greater emphasis was placed in the updated guidelines on lifestyle factors, including diet, exercise, and weight management.

The importance of what people put into their bodies was underscored with a new nutrition section, which included the following recommendations:

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'Healthy Obese' Have More Arterial Plaque
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, May 06, 2014 04:27 PM

The notion that people can be "fat but fit" is being challenged by a study showing a high prevalence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis -- as measured by CT coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores -- in obese subjects with no evidence of metabolic syndrome.

Compared with metabolically healthy people whose weight was normal, metabolically healthy obese (MHO) people had a higher prevalence of coronary calcification.  The two studies "cast serious doubt" on the claim that obese people without metabolic risk factors have no increased risk for cardiovascular disease, and they challenge the idea of "healthy obesity."

Authors claim obesity should be considered a disease and that no level of obesity can be dismissed as "healthy." 

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Vitamin D and Muscle Pain
Written by Editor   
Thursday, April 24, 2014 06:27 AM

Patients are presenting to the emergency department with widespread muscle pain may have very low levels of vitamin D, warns a case report in the Journal of Emergency Medicine.  This particular article describes a case report where A 22-year-old African-American woman complained of diffuse myalgia -- with pain in the chest, back, and legs -- for at least 4 months, had weakness in her upper and lower extremities, and that it was hard to move around and perform activities of daily living. 

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Function in Patients With Cervical Radiculopathy or Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders Compared With Healthy Volunteers
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 22, 2014 10:47 PM

The purposes of this study were to examine whether any differences in function and health exist between patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) due to disk disease scheduled for surgery and patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) and to compare measures of patients' physical function with those obtained from healthy volunteers.

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HTN Guidance Takes Center Stage
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 22, 2014 02:13 PM

Guidelines on hypertension management, particularly the JNC8 recommendations released last December, will be a major talking point at this year's National Kidney Foundation (NKF) spring clinical meetings.

Nephrologists are now more convinced that blood pressure targets need to be relaxed. "The medical community has been too rigid about blood pressure targets, especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Systolic pressure of 130 mm Hg for CKD was based more on opinion than strong evidence, and now we see that may be too rigid."

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Where Does RA Start?
Written by Editor   
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 10:04 PM

A century and more ago, the "oral sepsis" hypothesis was a widely held explanation for chronic disease, suggesting that many common disorders -- including arthritis -- originated in periodontal infections.This practice fell out of favor eventually because of a complete lack of symptomatic relief, and was largely forgotten.  But today, with the concept of the microbiome as an integral contributor to health and disease, the oral cavity, along with other mucosal sites, has once again become a source of attention among researchers.

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Chinese Herb Proves Effective in RA
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

A plant extract used in traditional Chinese medicine was as effective as methotrexate for the short-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and was superior when the two agents were given in combination, an open-label randomized trial showed.

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What Are Glucosamine and Chondroitin?
Written by Editor   
Thursday, April 10, 2014 11:09 PM

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine instructs that glucosamine and chondroitin are structural components of cartilage, the tissue that cushions the joints. Both are produced naturally in the body. They are also available as dietary supplements. Researchers have studied the effects of these supplements, individually or in combination, on osteoarthritis, a common type of arthritis that destroys cartilage in the joints.

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Sleep, the New Health Frontier
Written by Editor   
Thursday, April 10, 2014 08:14 AM

Your doctor could soon be prescribing crucial shuteye as treatment for everything from obesity to ADHD to mental health as experts say carving out time for sleep is just as important as diet and exercise.

Sleep therapists help teach patients to adjust sleep habits such as getting under the covers only when extremely tired; quit watching TV in bed; stop drinking caffeinated coffee in the evening. They also share breathing exercises to relax and help patients drift off. It is all quite simple and common sense, and, most importantly, noninvasive and didn’t require popping any pills.

“It’s common knowledge that sleep is needed for day to day function,” says Dr. David Rapoport, director of the Sleep Medicine Program at NYU School of Medicine. “What isn’t common knowledge is that it really matters—it’s not just cosmetic.” Rapoport is seeing an increasing number of patients being referred to his center for common diseases, disorders, and mental health.

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NSAIDs May Spark Afib
Written by Editor   
Thursday, April 10, 2014 12:57 AM

The risk of atrial fibrillation was higher among individuals ages 55 and older who were using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a Dutch study showed.  Current use of NSAIDs for 15 to 30 days was associated with a relative 76% greater risk of the arrhythmia compared with not using the drugs at any point during the study period.  The higher risk remained even when NSAIDs were not used currently but had been in the prior 30 days.

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Clinical: Lumbar paraspinal muscles
Written by Craig Benton, DC   
Tuesday, April 08, 2014 07:17 PM

Dr. Craig Benton shares with us that most of the clinical guidelines for back and neck pain show some of the highest evidence for treatments with spinal manipulation and exercise therapy.  Patients need to exercise because lower back pain has a recurrence rate of 73% within a one year period (pretty high), and one study for neck pain showed a recurrence rate of 85% in 5 years. 

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Diet Drinks Linked to Heart Risks in Older Women
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 08, 2014 06:52 PM

NBC Nightly News reported, “Research presented at the American College of Cardiology” meeting suggests that diet drinks may increase heart risks in older women and NBC News reported that investigators “studied nearly 60,000 middle-aged women taking part in a decade-long study of women’s health.” Participants “filled out a questionnaire on food and drinks as part of the study, including detailed questions on diet sodas and diet fruit drinks.” The investigators, “after just under nine years...checked to see what happened to the womens’ health.”

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Study: Married folks have fewer heart problems
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 08, 2014 06:37 PM

Research presented at the American College of Cardiology meeting suggests that “married people are less likely than singles, divorced or widowed folks to suffer any type of heart or blood vessel problem.”  This is the largest look at marriage and heart health,

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Stroke Rounds: Early Signs of Stroke Missed in Many Cases
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 08, 2014 12:00 AM

Many strokes may be missed in emergency departments (EDs) in the days before the problems become obvious, a retrospective study suggested.  Of 187,188 admissions for stroke, 12.7% were associated with an ED visit in the preceding 30-day period that ended with any non-cerebrovascular diagnosis, indicating a potentially missed stroke.  About one in every 10 of those potential misses were ED visits that ended with a discharge diagnosis of headache or dizziness, and those were considered probable missed strokes.

Several types of patients, including those younger than 45, women, and those from minority groups, had an increased likelihood of experiencing a missed stroke.  "This study provides some immediate suggestions to ED physicians who are evaluating patients with these symptoms -- be more attuned to the possibility of stroke in younger, female, and non-white patients."

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Paraplegics Get Leg Function Back With Electrical Stimulation
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 08, 2014 12:00 AM

Three more patients with complete lower-body paralysis regained some ability to move their legs and feet voluntarily with electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, researchers said.  Whereas the first patient required 7 months of stimulation before he showed any signs of voluntary movement in his lower extremities, the three subsequent patients were all moving their legs, feet, and/or toes within days of starting the treatment.

The intervention in all four patients consisted of a 16-electrode array implanted at vertebrae T11 and T12, over spinal cord segments L1 to S1. Epidural stimulation was delivered at varying voltages with frequencies of 25 or 30 Hz.  In addition to the stimulation, patients underwent standing and stepping training with body weight support, in the clinic or at home, for more than a year in one case and for up to 38 weeks in the newer patients.

All four had been paralyzed for at least 2 years. Two retained some sensory function in their lower extremities but no motor ability; the other two had neither sensory nor motor function.

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Diet Rich in Beans, Lentils, Peas Lowers LDL
Written by Editor   
Monday, April 07, 2014 12:00 AM

People who consumed a serving a day of dietary "pulses" -- such as beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas -- significantly reduced their low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, a meta-analysis concluded.  Those whose diets included a median pulse intake of 130 g/d had lower LDL cholesterol levels than those on a control diet.

The results were "equivalent to a reduction of about 5% from baseline" and consistent with the results of two previous meta-analyses.

"This is important especially for patients with hypercholesterolemia who prefer dietary approaches to managing their cholesterol levels, or for those who cannot tolerate statin therapies."

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Cardiovascular 'Usual' Sodium Intake Seems to Hit Right Balance
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 04, 2014 12:00 AM

A new analysis suggested that most people around the world are consuming just the right amount of sodium, although the American Heart Association questioned the findings.

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Archives of Integrative Clinical Practice Vol 2 (14), April 4, 2014
Written by Editor   
Friday, April 04, 2014 12:00 AM

This week's issue of Archives of Integrative Clinical Practice  Vol 2 (14), April 4, 2014

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Plant-Rich Diet, Longevity Linked Again
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 01, 2014 12:00 AM

New evidence backs up the advice of generations of moms ("eat your vegetables") and journalist/food activist Michael Pollan, who has told the world to "eat food, not too much, mostly plants." 

A population-based observational study conducted in England found a "robust inverse association" between fruit and vegetable consumption and death from all causes, including cancer and cardiovascular disease.  The largest benefits were seen in people who ate seven or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day compared with those who ate less than one serving, with the higher level of consumption associated with significantly lower all-cause mortality.

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Vitamin D Not Linked With Heart Risk in Men
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 01, 2014 12:00 AM

Circulating levels of vitamin D had no apparent influence on overall risk for cardiovascular disease in older men, although there was some evidence for an elevated risk for cerebrovascular events among those with low levels, researchers reported.

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Exercise Program Helps Kids' Hearts, Cuts Fat
Written by Editor   
Tuesday, April 01, 2014 12:00 AM

Normal and overweight children who took part in a 9-month, after-school exercise program showed improved cardiorespiratory fitness and modest reductions in overall fat and abdominal fat, researchers found.  The 8- and 9-year-old children participating in the exercise program increased cardiorespiratory fitness as measured by maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) percentile, while the control group showed no change in this measure of fitness.

The randomized controlled trial showed that an exercise program designed to meet daily activity recommendations for children can improve their overall fitness and help control weight.

More than 30% of children and adolescents in the U.S. are overweight, and the prevalence of extreme obesity has tripled since 1980.  Along with the rise in obesity, children in the U.S. are also increasingly sedentary. A 2008 study found that more than 50% of 6- to 11-year-olds and 90% of 12- to 15-year-olds do not get the recommended 60 minutes a day of moderate to vigorous physical activity.

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Consumer Perceptions of Chiropractic in Australia
Written by Editor   
Friday, March 28, 2014 12:00 AM

The purpose of this study was to describe patient characteristics and summarize their perceptions of chiropractic in Australia.

The survey focused on patient demographics, socioeconomic status, perceived health status, and perceptions of chiropractic and chiropractic services.

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